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Hancock Park 
Homeowners Association 
est. 1948

  • 25 Apr 2013 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Association Board Member Joel Kozberg has put together an instruction sheet for tree care, particularly useful for our stressed parkway trees. We haven’t had a lot of rain this winter and so parkway trees will need attention and regular watering to survive the summer. A copy of Joel’s tree facts can be found at the website, but the important highlights are:

    1. Stake young trees–They need help surviving winds and lawnmowers.
    2. Watering, and be sure it’s slow, deep watering –
    • First months after planting– water once to twice per week
    • From 4 to 12 months – water once every two or three weeks
    • Years 2 and after for parkway trees – once every 4 to 6 weeks
    3. Mulching – place a three or four inch layer of mulch around the tree, keeping about 2 inches around the trunk free of mulch.
    4. Feeding – Sprinkle dry fertilizer lightly around the tree line (the area of the ground under the ends of the tree branches) and water it into the soil.
    5. Pruning – The city rarely does pruning, and when it does it is often done poorly, so consult an arborist for recommendations.

    The Association is continuing to press the City for a schedule for fixing our deteriorating streets. Members of the Traffic Committee drove around with a DOT representative to show them all the potholes. The Traffic Committee is also continuing to demand that the City include our neighborhood’s input on the proposed changes to the City’s Mobility Element. Some of these changes could mean loss of traffic lanes and parking spaces.

    Remember that crime is still a problem so if you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service. Remember: Never confront a suspicious person, call 911. Report street light outages to the city at: http://bsl.lacity.org/. Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

  • 25 Apr 2013 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The following is some general information regarding the care of trees. The mature trees in Hancock Park are an important amenity that beautify the neighborhood and increase property values. Unfortunately, some of the mature street trees have either succumbed to disease or have otherwise reached the end of their lives and have had to be replaced. Fortunately, we have a good program lead by the Hancock Park Homeowners Association that plants replacement trees. However, the planting of replacement trees is only the first step in the long process of tree maturation. Think children growing up to become adults. In order for the young replacement trees to grow into the mature trees that we all appreciate and value requires that the young trees receive care and attention. The trees will not flourish without your help. A relatively small investment of your time and money will produce dividends for you and the generations that will come after you. If you do not do what is required for your trees, no one else will – the City of Los Angeles does not take care of street trees. Please do your part. Thank you.

    1. STAKING YOUNG TREES

    A young tree develops a stronger trunk if it is unsupported and can sway in the wind. (the technical reason is that as the trunk moves in the breeze, it releases chemicals called cytokinins, which cause the cells in the trunk to enlarge and thicken, thereby strengthening the plant tissue.) However, trees that are container grown (almost certainly the type of young tree that is planted in parkways or gardens in Los Angeles) have been closely staked their entire existence and likely do not have the strength to stand alone without staking after replanting. Combine that with the potential for strong Santa Ana winds, and staking during the first six months or year is the prudent choice.

    The tree should not be staked with a single stake immediately adjacent to the trunk – even though that may be the way the tree was staked in the nursery container. Beyond not giving the tree the motion it needs to strengthen, a stake driven immediately next to the trunk risks damaging the trunk and/or roots of the tree. Instead, two stakes should be used, placed on opposite sides of the trunk, each approximately 12-18 inches from the trunk (depending upon the size of the tree). Determine where to attach the ties by using your hand to find the place where support of the tree keeps it upright. Attach the ties about six inches above that point. Use soft ties that have broad smooth surfaces – available at nurseries. Leave some slack in the ties so that the tree can move about 2 inches in each direction – that will help strengthen the trunk. Do not use wire, rope or water hose filled with wire or rope – doing so can inhibit growth and girdle the trunk. Remove the stakes once the tree has sufficiently strengthened – approximately 6 months to one year after replanting.

    2. WATERING

    Trees benefit from deep and thorough watering – sprinkling with a hose for a few minutes does not provide adequate irrigation. Likewise, just watering the very top of the soil encourages root growth at the surface rather than deeper in the soil. The frequency of required watering is greatest for a newly planted tree and diminishes as the tree matures. The roots of a newly planted tree have been restricted to the area of the tree’s container – as the tree grows the roots will spread. The following are rough guidelines for a 15 gallon tree (the size of the container) receiving about 15 gallons of water at each watering (a larger tree will require proportionally more water):

    First month – water twice per week
    Months two and three – water once per week
    Months four through seven – water once every two weeks
    Months eight through twelve – water once every three to four weeks
    Years two through five – once every four to six weeks
    After five years, an established tree may only require infrequent irrigation.

    The foregoing are guidelines and may have to be varied depending upon actual conditions, including soil type, weather, etc. Too much water can be as harmful as too little. Check the soil for moisture level at a depth of about four inches – if it is very wet, do not water. The growth of your tree will be greatly affected by it receiving adequate (but not too much) water.

    3. MULCHING

    Mulching around the base of a tree has multiple benefits: (1) mulch insulates the soil helping to provide a buffer from heat and cold temperatures; (2) mulch helps the soil retain water, reducing the amount needed for irrigation; (3) mulch keeps weeds and grass out to help prevent root competition; (4) mulch prevents soil compaction; and (5) mulch reduces damage to the tree trunk from lawnmowers, string trimmers or other gardening equipment.

    Place a 3 – 4 inch layer of mulch around the tree. The mulch should be kept away from the trunk – at least two inches. The mulch can extend out as far as the drip-line of the tree – the outermost circumference of the tree’s canopy. However, recognizing that may be more mulch that you want, a circle or square area of mulch that stretches 2 feet from each side of the trunk will still be beneficial. Mulch is commercially available from a variety of sources, including home improvement stores. Wood or bark chips are good tree mulch and can provide a well-manicured appearance. Use chips that are approximately 1-3 inches in size.

    4. FEEDING

    Trees can benefit from feeding (fertilizing) – it will help stimulate growth and better establish the trees. However, a newly planted tree should not be fertilized for a couple of months to let it first get acclimated to its new location. Most of the root activity through which trees draw in nutrients occurs in the top 12 or so inches of the soil. Among the possible ways to feed a tree are dry fertilizer spread on the surface around the tree and liquid fertilizer injected into the soil. Dry fertilizer should be spread evenly over the entire root zone which can extend two to three times the width of the branches. Remember that some of the root zone may have already been fertilized when fertilizer was applied to the lawn or planting bed under or adjacent to the tree. Sprinkle the fertilizer on top of the soil or mulch and water lightly. Since the fertilizer will quickly move through the mulch there is no need to remove it or to place the fertilizer below it. Do not dump dry fertilizer in piles – doing so can cause the roots below the fertilizer to be burned and die. Liquid fertilizer can be injected into the soil using a root feeder – the Ross Deep Root Feeder is available online or at garden and home improvement stores. This is the link to the Home Depot: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ross-Root-Feeder-12044H/100328642#.UUjKHRdweSo It uses solid fertilizer tablets that are dissolved in water in the feeder and the liquid is injected through the feeder’s injector spike. In Los Angeles, trees can be fertilized once in the spring and once in the fall – the tree roots continue to grow in the winter, even if the leaves fall off or appear dormant. Trees can be overfed – more is not better. Too much feeding can result in too much growth that is weak. Consult with a qualified nursery regarding which fertilizer to use. Do not use so-called “weed and feed” fertilizers that incorporate a herbicide for weed control – the herbicide can harm your tree.

    5. PRUNING

    Young trees require proper pruning to achieve a strong structure and desirable form. Among other things, a tree that is not pruned is going to be more susceptible to damage from the wind or other elements. A tree that is not properly pruned when it is young will require more difficult and frequent corrective action as it matures. Generally, the goal of pruning is to establish a strong central trunk with sturdy, well placed branches. Meaningful pruning – beyond the removal of dead or damaged branches – should usually wait for a couple of years after planting to allow the tree to fully recover from the shock of transplanting. Proper pruning requires training and skill and often is better left to a professional. In the case of parkway trees, the city will not prune on a regular basis and the burden is upon the homeowner to ensure that the trees are properly cared for, including pruning.

    6. THE RESULTS OF PROPER TREE CARE
    The two trees depicted below were planted at the same time, in approximately 2006. The tree on the right has received regular tree care, including watering, feeding, mulching and pruning (it was pruned shortly before the photo was taken). The tree on the left essentially has been uncared for since it was planted. The difference between the trees is obvious. The tree that has received proper care has a larger trunk, is much taller and fuller and has a better form. In seven years it has become a handsome tree that helps beautify its street. The tree that has not been regularly cared for still looks like a recently planted tree and if it can recover from its neglect will take many more years to develop into a meaningful street tree like the one on the right.

  • 22 Feb 2013 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Association’s Annual Block Captain meeting was held on January 28th at Marlborough School. Over 40 of our HP block captains were in attendance and there was a lively discussion on topics including Emergency Preparedness and Security.

    CERT trained Larry Bogatz, stressed the importance of investing in personal drinking water storage tanks as the City’s infrastructure will be severely tested in an earthquake. LAPD’s Senior Lead Officer Dave Cordova updated residents on recent crime, and private patrol companies SSA‘s Jerry Shaw and Terry Seagraves and ADT‘s Steve Cushner provided tips to secure your home.

    Be safe.  Lock your car, set your alarm and put lights in your house on timers. To report a crime in progress or a medical emergency call 911. If you observe suspicious activity call Wilshire Police Desk 213-473-0476. You can also call our Senior Lead Officer (SLO) Dave Cordova- cell phone at 213-793-0650 and notify your private security patrol cars. If you Have Neighborhood Questions and Need Information. Please visit our website  www.HancockPark.org! You will be able to find information on:

    • Security
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • Parkway Tree Replacement and Care
    • HPOZ/Preservation Plan Questions
    • Block Captain/Neighborhood Watch Information
    • Filming Guidelines for the Neighborhood
    • We also have a Comprehensive Listing of Useful
    Contact Numbers: that include Pothole Repair,
    • Streetlight outages, and Graffiti reporting.
    • HPHOA’48 Committee Chairs and Contact Information

  • 9 Jan 2013 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Association officers for the upcoming year are: President, Cindy Chvatal-Keane; Vice-President, Susan Grossman; Recording Secretary, Jennifer DeVore; Corresponding Secretary, Gerda McDonough; Treasurer, Victoria Vickers. The Association does much of its work through its committees so please consider joining a committee. The committees are: Parkway Trees; Land Use/ Zoning; Traffic ; HPOZ; LAPD/Security; Block Captains / Neighborhood Watch / Emergency Preparedness; School Liaison; and Parking; .

    In December the City will release a draft of the new Mobility Element, which is part of the City’s General Plan. It will include six major policies resulting from their online Town Hall. A draft format of the City’s new “Networked Streets” plan will be released mid-January; including streets that will be “enhanced” for various modes of transportation. Rossmore is no longer being considered as a “Bike Superhighway”. The City is now looking at LaBrea Ave , which includes the option of a buffered bike lane. The Traffic Committee continues to be involved in this process and works with the City on keeping Hancock Park Streets safe

    Don’t forget that crime can be a problem during the holidays. Keep safe by following simple precautions such as 1) Lock your car with valuables out of sight; 2) Set your alarm; 3) Stop papers, and mail if out of town; and 4) Put lights on timers; To report a crime in progress or a medical emergency call 911. If you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service, if you are a subscriber. Crime prevention tips are available at website: http://www.lapdonline.org . Remember: Never confront a suspicious person.

    If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).


  • 9 Jan 2013 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Thanks to everyone who attended and made the Association’s Annual meeting a great success. We also thank those who gave presentations and we especially thank John Burroughs Middle School Principal Steve Martinez for providing the venue and giving great support for the meeting. The following are some of the highlights.

    The LAPD reported that while crime is down somewhat in Hancock Park from the highs earlier this year, we’re still at risk. So, remember to follow simple safety precautions like locking your car, keeping valuables out of sight, setting your house alarm, if you have one; stopping papers and mail if you’re out of town; putting lights on timers and always being careful before opening your door. To report a crime in progress or a medical emergency call 911 and remember: Never confront a suspicious person.

    School Committee Chair, Joanne Medeiros, who has spearheaded the John Burroughs beautification project, reported that the large sign constructed in the 1970’s has been removed. Designs are now being developed and funds raised for new, more appropriate, signage. The beautification team, which includes neighbors, JB teachers and administrators, is to be congratulated for making JB more beautiful and attractive for students and the neighborhood.

    The City is updating the Transportation Element of the General Plan including a new requirement that streets be accessible to all users. To achieve these goals streets all over the city, including many Hancock Park streets, have had changes proposed to add Bike Lanes and Bus-only lanes. This may involve the removal of Parking and/or Traffic Lanes, as well as STOP Signs. The Association has done a survey of residents’ opinions about the plan and is providing feedback to the city. Our residents are encouraged to join the Associations’ email list, so they can be informed and make their views known. To join email our President Cindy Chvatal-Keane at snorekel@aol.com or include your email when you pay your annual Association dues.
    If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

  • 11 Oct 2012 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Association’s annual meeting will be Tuesday, October 16th at John Burroughs Middle School at 7PM.  Among many presentations homeowners will hear about security from the LAPD, ADT and SSA and get a report from the Council Office.  There will also be a discussion of the upcoming changes to the Transportation Element part of the General Plan which includes possible new bike lanes and other modifications that will impact our neighborhood’s streets.  And, most importantly, you and your neighbors will have the opportunity to ask questions, make suggestions and find out about projects that can use you as a volunteer.  And, because the meeting is going to be held at John Burroughs, you’ll have a chance to see the wonderful work Board member Joanne Medeiros, along with volunteers and the John Burroughs Staff, has done to beautify the campus.  So plan on attending!

    If you’re a member in good standing, having paid your annual dues, watch your mailbox for your Board of Directors ballot.  Please mark your ballot and return it so your vote counts.  You can either mail the ballot or bring it with you to the annual meeting where the ballots will be counted and results announced.

    Don’t forget to deep water your trees, both in the parkway and on your property.  Also, remember to take simple precautions to protect your property and family by locking your car, keeping valuables out of sight; set your house alarm, if you have one; stop papers and mail if you’re out of town; put lights on timers and always be careful before opening your door.  To report a crime in progress or a medical emergency call 911. If you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service, if you are a subscriber.  Always get details.  Let our LAPD Senior Lead Officer (SLO), David Cordova; (213) 793-0650; 31646@lapd.lacity.org know if you have a question, or just want to introduce yourself.  Crime prevention tips are available at website:  http://www.lapdonline.org .  Remember:  Never confront a suspicious person.

    If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at:  http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org).   Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org .  Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).


  • 19 Jul 2012 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Christine Bubser

    Christine Bubser has lived in Hancock Park since 2001. She has been quadrant leader for Quardrant One and a member of the HPHA board for one term. She was previously a board member of the Hancock Park HPOZ board and worked very hard with the other board members, the City Planning department and applicants to make sure the implementation of the plan went smoothly. Chris has served on the HPHA graffiti committee, traffic committee, tree committee and the HPOZ committee. Chris and her husband, David have two children in elementary school.

    Cindy Chvatal-Keane

    Cindy Chvatal-Keane has been a member of the HPHA board for fifteen years and she currently serves as the Board President. Cindy also co-chairs the Block Captain/Neighborhood Watch, Historic Preservation and Land Use Committees. This year she is helping formulate a plan for the long term care and maintenance of Hancock Park’s parkway trees. Cindy developed and maintains the current block captain email information system,which provides the neighborhood with information about a wide range of issues important to residents such as: crime activity, emergency procedures, lost pets, traffic issues, and City meetings that involve Hancock Park, and HPHOA meetings. She believes strongly in preserving the residential character of Hancock Park and it’s R 1 Zoning designation, which protects the status of single family homes. Cindy co founded the Hancock Park Historic Preservation Advocacy Group and was a key player in the process that culminated in the establishment of an HPOZ for Hancock Park. She currently serves as an alternate director on Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council, is a member of the Executive Committee of the California Science Center and an Executive Producer of the television series C S I.

    Jennifer DeVore

    Jennifer DeVore has been on the HPHOA Board for eight years. She is currently Recording Secretary of the Board and works on historic preservation, emergency preparedness among other committees. She also serves on the Hancock Park HPOZ board reviewing proposed remodels and additions in our neighborhood and is on the board of the Ebell and the Yale Club of LA. She is a stay-at-home mother to 3 boys. Previously, she was director of marketing at the Los Angeles Times. Jennifer received her BA in American Studies from Yale and her MBA from UCLA.

    Joel Kozberg

    Joel Kozberg is a native of Los Angeles and has lived in Hancock Park for over 15 years. He is a trial attorney who specializes in the litigation of complex business disputes. As a board member of the HPHOA, he has responsibility for matters implicating legal issues. In addition to his legal training, Joel also has degrees in business and architecture, having received an MBA at UCLA and an AB at UC Berkeley. Joel also serves as a board member of Los Angeles Team Mentoring, an organization that mentors at-risk middle school students, including participants at John Burroughs in Hancock Park.

    Joanne Medeiros

    Joanne Medeiros was raised in West Los Angeles and is a proud graduate of UCLA for her BA, and Occidental College for her MA in Education. She is currently the Southern California Manager for ELLE DECOR and House Beautiful, two of the leading design titles published by Hearst Magazines.  She has a passion for residential design, gardens and architecture developed through  her professional career and international travel.  She moved to Hancock Park seven years ago, remodeling her 1930 Mediterranean villa. Joanne was an important part of the team that planned and implemented the John Burroughs Middle School beautification project.  With the help of HPHOA and WSHPHS, over $150,000 in local funds were raised to upgrade the school and surrounding grounds.

    Renee Mochkatel

    Renee Mochkatel, who has lived in Hancock Park since 1994, is an attorney with Allred, Maroko & Goldberg, representing clients in employment-related matters.  She graduated from Cal Poly, Pomona, in 1979 with a Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude.  She then attended Pepperdine University receiving her Juris Doctorate in 1982.  Renee sits on the Executive Committee of the Labor and Employment section of the L.A. County Bar Association, where she has also served as a guest lecturer.  She has authored several articles for the Daily Journal on topics dealing with employment law and sits on the Board of Temple Israel of Hollywood.   Renee is married to Stefanie Hall and their daughter, Sophie, attends Marlborough School.

    Gary Nelson

    Gary Nelson has been a Hancock Park resident for 23 years and has served on the Board for over 10 years.  He has worked on traffic, street lighting and trees working closely with Hollywood Beatification Team on recent tree plantings. Currently maintains membership roster. Earned his BSME from Kansas State and MBA from USC. He is president of Churchill Mortgage, a commercial mortgaging firm.

    Pam Newhouse

    Pam Newhouse has lived in Hancock Park since 1992 and has been a member of the HPHA Board of Directors since 1996.  She is currently Corresponding Secretary of the Association and a member of the Parkway Tree Committee, which works on neighborhood beautification through the restoration of Hancock Park’s parkway tree canopy.  She also co-chairs the Graffiti Committee and has been active on the Land Use/Zoning Committee and Traffic Committee.  Pam is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law School and has worked as a finance attorney.

    Victoria Vickers

    In her over ten years on the Hancock Park Homeowners Board, Victoria Vickers has served the community in a variety of positions including recording secretary, membership records, traffic committee, neighborhood watch block captain, and HPOZ committee.  She currently is the treasurer of the Association.  She looks forward to addressing the concerns of the community and preserving the Hancock Park we all know and love.

  • 18 Jun 2012 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    On May 31st our Councilman, Tom LaBonge, hosted a public safety meeting at John Burroughs Middle School.  He was joined by LAPD Captains Robert Arcos of the Olympic Division and Eric Davis of the Wilshire Division.  Captain Davis confirms that there has been an increase in crime in our area this year.  In particular there is a sophisticated group of criminals operating in areas like Hancock Park.  They often work during the day, knock on doors and if no one is home break in.  The LAPD put together a task force, Operation Knock-Knock, to better focus on breaking up this group and there have been some arrests. 

    The LAPD reminds us that the best defense against crime is to take some simple precautions:  1) Keep your car locked and valuables, including CPSs, telephones, chargers, money, documents and mail, out of sight; 2) Set your house alarm, if you have one; 3) When out of town have papers stopped, mail picked up, keep a car in the driveway and put timers on lights; 4) If anyone comes to the door make them identify themselves before opening the door; and if not opening the door, make it clear someone is at home. 

    To report a crime in progress or a medical emergency call 911.  If you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service, if you are a subscriber.  If you are making a report try to be as clear as possible, and collect details, such as descriptions of cars, people, locations and activities.  Use your phone’s camera to photograph license plates, cars or anything questionable.  The police are compiling a list of all surveillance cameras so they can check neighboring cameras if a crime occurs.  Please let our LAPD Senior Lead Officer (SLO), David Cordova; (213) 793-0650; 31646@lapd.lacity.org know if you have a surveillance camera, if you have a question, or just want to introduce yourself.  Crime prevention tips are available at website:  http://www.lapdonline.org .  Remember:  Never confront a suspicious person.

    If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at:  http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org).   Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org .  Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).


  • 5 Jun 2012 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    HPHOA, est. 1948 board member Joan Medeiros has had another success in improving the look of our public schools.  The fence on the 3rd Street side of the 3rd Street School has been covered with ‘permanent’ ivy called ‘Ivy-It’ which is a 100% recycled polyethylene.  It has a natural variegated leaf pattern and is used by cities and utilities to provide an attractive cover for areas that are heavily graffitied.

    We welcome our new Board member, Renee Mochkatel.  Renee is an attorney with Allred, Maroko & Goldberg, representing clients in employment-related matters.  She graduated from Cal Poly, Pomona, in 1979 with a Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude.  She then attended Pepperdine University receiving her Juris Doctorate in 1982.  Renee sits on the Executive Committee of the Labor and Employment section of the L.A. County Bar Association, where she has also served as a guest lecturer.  She has authored several articles for the Daily Journal on topics dealing with employment law and sits on the Board of Temple Israel of Hollywood.   Renee is married to Stefanie Hall and their daughter, Sophie, attends Marlborough School.

    Crime continues to be a problem so remember to 1) Keep your car locked and  valuables out of sight; 2) Set your house alarm, if you have one; 3) When out of town have papers stopped, mail picked up, keep a car in the driveway and put timers on lights; 4) If anyone comes to the door have them identify themselves before opening the door.  Report crimes or suspicious activity by calling 911 and your security service, if you are a subscriber; the Wilshire Division LAPD station-213-473-0476 or our Senior Lead Officer, Dave Cordova (213-793-0650; 31646@lapd.lacity.org)..  Try and get a description of the person and any identifying vehicle information such as make and model of a car a license plate numbers.  Never confront a suspicious person yourself.


  • 28 Apr 2012 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Your Association has just completed its second series of tree plantings, planting trees in empty parkways throughout Hancock Park. Since summer is almost here now’s a good time to start summer care for all your trees, not just the ones in the parkways.  Water deeply, once or twice a month, fertilize with the appropriate fertilizer and keep lawns cut back from the tree’s trunk, by at least a foot.  If properly cared for and watered your trees will provide shade, water retention, homes for wildlife and beauty to your house and neighborhood.  We’re now planning the next tree planting, so contact Tree Committee Chair, Susan Grossman, SEGrossman@sbcglobal.net , and we’ll get you in the next group.

    Security is on everyone’s minds these days because of the many recent home break-ins.  Security Chair, Peter Gorelick has been working closely with the LAPD and the private security services to monitor the situation and has the following recommendations to help you avoid becoming the victim of a crime:

    • Keep your car locked and keep any valuables out of sight.
    • If your home has an alarm system, set the alarm; even if you’re only going to be out for a few minutes.
    • If you’re out of town have your papers stopped or picked up, have mail picked up, keep a car parked in the driveway and have timers on lights and electronics so that thieves will think someone is at home.
    • If anyone comes to your door ask that they identify themselves before opening the door.

    If you observe suspicious activity or witness a crime call 911 and your security service, if you are a subscriber.  Try and get a description of the person and any identifying vehicle information such as make and model of a car a license plate numbers.  Never confront a suspicious person yourself.

    If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at:  http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org).

    Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org .  Also, In the event of a crime contact the Wilshire Division LAPD station – 213-473-0476 or website: http://www.lapdonline.org/wilshire_community_police_station as well as our Senior Lead Officer, Dave Cordova (213-793-0650; 31646@lapd.lacity.org). Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).


Address: 137 North Larchmont Boulevard # 719, Los Angeles, CA 90004



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